Playing Rut to Riches Board Game

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Recently I was invited to play a Board Game that would teach Financial Intelligence. I have had played Cashflow 101 before and blogged about it, so I was interested to see what else was out there.

I remembered playing the game before, but it was then called SmartMoney, But now it is called Rut to Riches. After the game, I searched for it on the internet, and found www.rut2riches.com. Here is my comparison for this game to Cashflow 101.

  • Cashflow 101 is simpler. I put the complexity of SmartMoney to be between Cashflow 101 and 202.
  • Rut to Riches uses Cashbook accounting, rather then using those play money. Bear in mind some people may actually enjoy holding fake money in hand, but this is just more neat.
  • Rut to Riches takes into account network marketing. I found it strange that Kiyosaki mentioned Network Marketing/MLM/Direct Selling in his books and yet did not include them in his games.
  • Rut to Riches takes into account Royalty in terms of Books and Movies.
  • Rut to Riches uses the Inner Circle as a Fast Track with the use of a Mentor. Cashflow uses The outside lane as the fast track, but the player is no longer affected by good and bad cards, while in the rut to riches, the “retired” player may still be affected.
  • Rut to Riches gameplay is quicker with the fact that “plot twist” cards are taken in bundles. e.g. Share market cards are taken in two’s, and any deal cards is followed by the market forces card.

Overall, I think Rut to Riches is an improvement (albeit probably a copy cat) of Kiyosaki’s Cashflow 101/202. But due to the complexity, I’d recommend Cashflow for beginners. Which probably explains my frustrations with misconceptions that some the “experts” who was supposed to be teaching us had. I was a bit confused by some explanations, but not because I didn’t understand, but it just didn’t made sense, Which I read the rule book available online to be sure, I’ve highlighted the rule or issue, followed by the misconception, followed by my opinion and understanding is the correction:

  • Issue of Savings. Savings was “taken out” our hands to make our cashflow balance zero. When it made more sense that it was taken “In” to our hands as money to be played. This of course what I understood from playing Cashflow.
  • Overdrafts were limited to (current cashflow + potential income) x 8. The “expert” players added a rule about “minus the amount you already borrowed”, when that has been clearly dealt with in putting 10% in the expenses for the amount borrowed.
  • Players may play pay of their liabilities (This one’s annoying). The “expert” players kept on pressing on paying of liabilities, and after at the end explaining about Net Worth = Assets + (cash balance) – Liabilites, and affirming everyone had very small or negative net worth, they stated it was because they didn’t pay off their liabilities. I had a huge net worth, but I didn’t pay those liabilities. Real example is Donald Trump has billions in debt, but billions in net worth. The key is to gain cash producing assets.
  • Directway (in relation to most MLM’s being somethingWay) are mostly not affected by market forces. Ok this maybe more of strategy then just a rule. I noticed the “expert” player was mostly targeting to get the DirectWay Cards. These guys didn’t even get out of the Rut! I’m thinking because these “experts” are mostly into Network Marketing that they played into their beliefs. But if they read Kiyosaki’s Books carefully, he basically states that the key to riches is multiple streams of income. A balance of Stocks, Real Estate and Business, not just Network Marketing. But Network marketing is probably the best for hard workers, socialites and risk averse individuals.

Overall, it was a fun game (considering I was the only one in my table that got out of the rut), and when I get the chance I would like to have a discussion with the “expert” players on my findings from reading the rule book. Last time I had to hurry to get to another function that day. Oh for more information on the playing board game, contact the people from www.yesinvMS.com

Playing Games to Educate ourselves financially

Last Saturday on 8th May 2010, Some LiveWIRE participants/members played an expensive board game called Cashflow 101 created by Robert T Kiyosaki, the guy who wrote Rich Dad Poor Dad, Cashflow Quadrant and other Rich Dad Series books.

The game is similar to Monopoly. Monopoly teaches the players about real estate, the value of land and the buildings on it. Cashflow expands the idea on how rich people become rich through Business, Real Estate and Stocks.

The game starts with the player choosing  their color, then uses a small rat statue of that color, and places a cheese of the color onto their dream on the outer track or fast track. Then the player chooses a job card ranging from a janitor, teacher to a lawyer or a pilot. The cards contain a simple financial statement of assets, liabilities,income and expenses. the person then copies them down to a form provided. The player will get the amount of cashflow (=income – expenses) everytime they pass the “paycheck” square. other squares on the board affects the player’s financial statements. e.g. Continue reading